Is it acceptable for employees to cry at work?

As the rules of the workplace slowly shift, what employees consider appropriate conduct has changed too

Is it acceptable for employees to cry at work?

As the rules of the workplace slowly shift, what employees consider appropriate conduct has changed too.   

A recent report from Robert Half has found that over four in ten Canadian workers have cried on the job, with almost half of executives agreeing it’s acceptable.

After interviewing over 300 employees, and over 250 CFOs, the study shed some light on how crying is perceived at work. Thirty percent of employees believing that crying is okay from time to time, however if you do it too often it can undermine your job prospects.

However, for 38% of workers, crying is totally unacceptable and doing so at work will make colleagues perceive you as weak.

“Occasionally getting emotional at work is understandable, but frequent upsets can damage your reputation, and negatively impact co-worker relationships and productivity,” said David King, Canadian president of Accountemps, a Robert Half affiliation.

“In frustrating situations, it helps to take a step back before you react. Approaching challenges with patience and composure demonstrates your professionalism and can set you apart for career advancement or growth opportunities.”

Employees aged 55 and older are more likely to think that crying has a negative effect on reputation than their younger counterparts. More than half of employees admit to having lost their temper on the job, with 64% claiming their emotional outburst was directed toward a colleague; a further 34% said it was directed at their manager.

Do you think it acceptable to cry at work? Tell us in the comments.

 

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