HR and social technology: A perfect match?

Social software is all the rage these days. In a world where social connectivity is viewed as a key point of interaction, workplaces across North America have benefited from this software.

HR and social technology: A perfect match?

Social software is all the rage these days. In a world where social connectivity is viewed as a key point of interaction, workplaces across North America have benefited from this software.

Many common workplace divisions, such as IT, have realized the power of social software, and have embraced it. Some people even claim to be early adopters of new social technologies, which has made the implementation process a relatively seamless one for business managers.

“HR departments have to deal with a number of challenges,” explains Stefan Pfeiffer, Marketing Lead for Social Business at IBM Europe. “On the one hand, they have the Facebook generation employees who automatically bring their social web behavior and work styles with them to the company.”

But one area that seems to have been left off of the list is human resources, despite the fact that social media platforms and associated software is relevant to its daily functions.

As an increasing amount of companies continue to experience high employee turnover rates, Pfeiffer notes that older employees, aged between 40 and 55, tend to be less interested in using social media, although some have adopted it. This has become an issue, as workplaces often rely on their veteran employees for their knowledge and experience.

“The first camp wants and demands social software on the job, and is used to transparent sharing,” Pfeiffer says of the division between users and non-users. “The second often refuses to use the social web, even outside of work, and has always relied on e-mail to meet its needs.” (continued.)

#pb#

In order to retain these older and wiser employees, Pfeiffer believes that HR managers need to motivate them as much as possible. By properly educating them on the benefits of social media, and how they can enhance the everyday workplace experience and the sharing of knowledge, data and information, the veteran employees may change their minds, thus decreasing the high turnover rates.

“To hold on to them, they need to continue to motivate and educate them,” Pfeiffer says. “The longer the qualified employees stick around, the more the company will benefit and profit from them. Keeping the most talented workers on board for the long term is becoming one of the most important jobs of HR departments.”
 

Free newsletter

Our daily newsletter is FREE and keeps you up-to-date with the world of HR. Please complete the form below and click on subscribe for daily newsletters from HRD Canada.

Recent articles & video

5 gender myths killing your D&I agenda

The perils of failing to accommodate mental health disabilities

How to build a succession plan

Minister Bains speaks on the importance of HR tech

Most Read Articles

What's the key to achieving workplace happiness?

Global CHRO reveals future of 'transformational' HR

This type of employee struggles to befriend their colleagues