McDonald's Canada outlet closes after employee tests positive for COVID-19

"We are working to ensure our timeline to reopen happens as quickly and safely as possible, as we know our guests depend on their local McDonald's and we are committed to doing our part to help our communities"

McDonald's Canada outlet closes after employee tests positive for COVID-19

As COVID-19 continues to rage on, more and more companies are feeling the effect of minimalized or destroyed businesses.

Last week, McDonald’s Canada announced the closure of two locations in Edmonton after workers in the franchise tested positive for coronavirus. The outlets, one on 8 Avenue and 34 Street the other on Webber Greens Drive, will be closed for intensive cleaning.

In a news release, McDonald’s announced; “Out of an abundance of caution, the decision was made to immediately shut down the restaurant for a thorough cleaning and sanitization by a certified third party.

“We are working to ensure our timeline to reopen happens as quickly and safely as possible, as we know our guests depend on their local McDonald’s and we are committed to doing our part to help our communities.”

Looking out for workplace health and safety had never been more important, as HR leaders are constantly looking to safeguard employee wellbeing in this time of crisis.

Speaking to HRD Canada, Stuart Rudner, founder of employment law firm Rudner Law, explained the potential ramifications of employees catching the virus at work.

An employee can’t sue based upon exposure,” explained Rudner. “But they can raise a claim based upon actual damage. If the employee becomes sick and suffers any kind of damage or loss, then they could look at raising a legitimate claim. In most cases, however, businesses are covered by Workplace Safety Insurance or Workers’ Compensation, depending on which province you operate in.”

And it’s not just physical wellbeing that’s under threat – employee mental health is at a breaking point. A survey from Lumino Health found that almost 60% of workers report that COVID-19 has derogatorily impacted their mental wellbeing.

Speaking to Dr Jarik Conrad, r. Director of Human Insights and HCM Evangelism at Ultimate Software, he implored employers to take the time to identify workers who’re suffering in silence.

“Employers should be looking out for people who are not quite on their game. For example, perhaps they’re inconsistent with things that they’re usually consistent with. They might be very dependable employees – then, suddenly, they start to miss deadlines or drift off in meetings. The key is to watch out for subtle behavioural changes.”

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