Should employees celebrate sports at work?

With professional and personal lives becoming increasingly blurred, employees may often find themselves craving home comforts in the office

Should employees celebrate sports at work?

With professional and personal lives becoming increasingly blurred, employees may often find themselves craving home comforts in the office.

As a nation, one of our favourite pastimes is watching sports. The comradery, the excitement – it’s all conducive to a great day out. But should be bringing that kind of fun into the workplace?

A recent report from Robert Half found that 45% of Canadian employees are not really into sports-related activities in the office, whilst 33% said they would rather not celebrate it at all in the office.

Less than one quarter of workers claim they really enjoy being able to keep up with their sports teams in the office, with employees spending an average of 8.5 minutes each day watching sports during peak basketball season.

“Engaging with sport-related activities at work can be a great way to support office camaraderie, but it’s important that managers recognize not everyone is a sports fan,” said Koula Vasilopoulos, a district president for OfficeTeam.

“Look for ways to involve the entire team, using staff feedback to organize friendly competitions, themed lunches, or designating areas to talk sports. Encouraging employees to choose how they participate ensures everyone benefits from the opportunity to take a refreshing break and bond with colleagues.”

Would you let your workers watch sports at work? Tell us in the comments.

 

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