'Whistleblower' allegedly 'tied and gagged' after complaining of workplace abuse

A Canadian woman claims she fell prey to bullying and harassment at work, courtesy of her male colleagues

'Whistleblower' allegedly 'tied and gagged' after complaining of workplace abuse

A Canadian woman claims she fell prey to bullying and harassment at work, courtesy of her male colleagues.

A picture has emerged of fisheries worker DeeAnn Fitzpatrick tied and gagged with brown tape, during an incident which she alleges was part of a bullying campaign when working for Marine Scotland.

Fitzpatrick claims that when she complained, her manager is alleged to have thought this was a case of ‘boys being boys’ rather than a serious case of bullying.

Canadian Fitzpatrick has brought the case to the Scottish government, who rules the fishing watchdog, claiming the workplace was misogynist in its culture.

After the alleged incident in which she was bound and gagged, Fitzpatrick claims that one of the bullies told her: “This is what you get when you speak out against the boys.”

Speaking to the BBC, Fitzpatrick's sister in law said: “We were horrified. We were sickened. We worry about what this has done to her.

“She's not giving up and now her family is behind her, and we're not giving up until someone is made accountable for their actions.”

One of the alleged bullies was contacted for comment by the BBC, whom he told: “These are false allegations. I can't remember the event you mention, but if it did happen, it would have been office banter.

“Just a craic. Certainly nothing to do with abuse.”

Spokesperson for the Scottish government added: “The Scottish government has clear standards of behaviour which apply to all staff.

 

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