Citigroup to launch hiring spree

Finally, some good news after months of companies announcing layoffs and hiring freezes

Citigroup to launch hiring spree

Citigroup has announced plans for a hiring spree to fill a new division.

The New York City-based financial services corporation intends to hire 500 employees over the next three years, Bloomberg News reported. The new division, called Wealth at Work, would cater to junior employees at private equity offices and accounting firms. The strategy is that those clients will hopefully maintain their relationship with Citigroup as they progress in their career.

Read more: Safeguard Global CTO: Tech talent remains highly sought after

It's a refreshing change of pace after months of companies announcing layoffs and hiring freezes ahead of an anticipated recession. According to professional social network Blind’s tech layoffs tracker, more than 450 startups and technology companies have laid off more than 75,000 people in 2022, including more than 20,000 jobs cut in the last month alone.

Last week, Vox Media laid off 39 employees in the sales, marketing, recruiting and editorial departments, CNBC reported. Additionally, the mass media company with offices in New York City and Washington D.C. will be slowing down hiring and reducing non-essential expenses.

The week prior, CNBC reported that 7-Eleven has eliminated about 880 corporate jobs in the United States. The Dallas-headquartered company’s Irving, TX and Enon, OH, support centers were impacted, as well as field support roles. The workforce reduction comes roughly one year after the convenience store chain completed its $21 billion acquisition of rival Speedway.

Meanwhile, Bloomberg News reported that Apple plans to slow hiring and spending growth next year. Google told employees that it’ll be “slowing down the pace of hiring for the rest of the year,” according to an internal memo by CEO Sundar Pichai obtained by The Verge. Pichai said the Mountain View, CA-based company isn’t freezing hiring entirely; it’ll still hire for “engineering, technical and other critical roles.” But the pullback will mean “pausing development and re-deploying resources to higher priority areas,” according to the memo.

The memo came on the heels of Meta, formerly known as Facebook, giving engineering managers a deadline to identify anyone on their team who “needs support” and report them in an internal HR system, The Information reported. “If a direct report is coasting or is a low performer, they are not who we need; they are failing this company,” wrote Maher Saba, the company’s head of engineering. “As a manager, you cannot allow someone to be net neutral or negative for Meta.”

Last month, Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg told staffers during a companywide call that not everyone was meeting the Menlo Park, CA-based company’s standards and that some might want to leave voluntarily, Reuters reported. Zuckerberg added the company planned on reducing plans to hire engineers by at least 30% this year.

“If I had to bet, I’d say that this might be one of the worst downturns that we’ve seen in recent history,” Zuckerberg said. “Realistically, there are probably a bunch of people at the company who shouldn’t be here.”

Over the past couple months, JPMorgan Chase & Co., the biggest bank in the United States, and Coinbase, the biggest crypto currency exchange in the country, have both laid off hundreds of employees. Streaming giant Netflix followed suit, announcing its second round of cuts within two months. Tesla went one step further by closing its San Mateo, CA-based facility, laying off hundreds in the process. With the housing, crypto and tech markets all facing upheaval, more companies are expected to trim their workforce in the months to come.

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