Dating app start-up Bumble unveils unlimited leave policy for employees

The company also makes paid time-off for two weeks of office closure a permanent perk

Dating app start-up Bumble unveils unlimited leave policy for employees

Dating app start-up Bumble has unveiled a new policy of unlimited paid leaves for its 700 employees, according to a recent BBC report.

The announcement follows Bumble’s move last month to give its entire global staff paid time-off to manage work-related stress by closing its office for a week – a decision that has since become a permanent twice-a-year perk at the Austin, Texas-based company.

Read more: Female-led dating app Bumble plans to go public

"It's becoming increasingly clear that the way that we work, and need to work, has changed and our new policies are a reflection of what really matters and how we can best support our teams in both their work and life," said Tarek Shaukat, president of Bumble, as reported by the BBC.

In addition to its new unlimited leave policy, CNBC reported that Bumble – which has offices in Barcelona, London, and Moscow – has also launched other new benefits for its employees – including a minimum six months of paid leave for the birth, adoption, or surrogacy of a child; 12 weeks of paid leave to take care of a family member; and a minimum four weeks of flexible working for caregivers to transition back to work. 

Employees are also not expected to return to a physical office after working remotely over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic and will be able to utilize co-working spaces if they are unable to work at home.

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