Boeing CEO pens open letter after 737 tragedy: 'We're all humbled'

'This tragedy won’t define the aviation industry,' wrote CEO Dennis Muilenburg

Boeing CEO pens open letter after 737 tragedy: 'We're all humbled'

The recent disasters involving the Boeing 737 Max 8 have left the US aircraft maker “humbled,” according to its CEO – even as more questions are raised about the reliability of its flight software.

In an open letter to the aviation industry, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said: “We are all humbled and learning from this experience.”

“In the weeks since the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accident, the airline’s crews have demonstrated this by continuing to serve the flying public with distinction and professionalism.”

“[This] tragedy does not define Ethiopian – and it won’t define the aviation industry or our enduring relationship with their team. For those of us who have worked with them over the years, this comes as no surprise,” said Muilenburg.

Earlier this month, an Ethiopian Airlines B737 crashed six minutes after take-off and killed all 157 passengers and crew. Six months prior, a similar incident occurred in Indonesia, when a Lion Air B737 plummeted into the Java Sea, leaving all 189 on board dead.

Airline workers across the world protested the continued use of other B737 jets in the immediate aftermath of the disasters.

In the US, flight attendants and ground crew called on their employers to take a stand in favour of grounding the planes.

“Our flight attendants are very concerned with the recent Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 crash, which has raised safety concerns with the 737 Max 8,” said Lori Bassani, president of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants. The APFA represents 27,000 American flight attendants.

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