CEOs urged to commit to fighting antisemitism in workplaces

'With antisemitism surging around the world, there's no more important moment than now for all companies to speak out'

CEOs urged to commit to fighting antisemitism in workplaces

Chief executive officers of major corporations are being encouraged to sign a pledge from the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) that aims to actively prevent antisemitism in workplaces.

"With antisemitism surging around the world, there's no more important moment than now for all companies to speak out," said ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt in a statement.

"Corporations must use their bully pulpits to strongly and forcefully condemn antisemitism in all forms and to ensure that their workplaces remain safe places for Jewish employees."

According to the ADL, signing to the pledge would see employers commit to the following actions:

  • Addressing antisemitism in their Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion educational strategies
  • Supporting Jewish employees through various mechanisms, including resource groups, affinity groups, or programming
  • Ensuring robust religious accommodation policies
  • Using the organisation's platform on social media to speak out against antisemitism

So far, more than a dozen brands have committed to this pledge, such as Accenture, adidas, AEG, American Eagle Outfitters, Inc., CLYDE, Deutsch LA, Google, Harris Blitzer Sports & Entertainment, NASCAR, National Basketball Association (NBA), New York Life, Northwell Health, Simon Property Group, Turner Construction Company, and UTA, among others.

Greenblatt said they are "pleased" to see major corporations and big-name brands signing up for the pledge.

"Their leadership is exemplary, and we are excited for many more brands to follow their lead in the weeks and months to come," he said.

According to the ADL, every Fortune 500 company has received information on antisemitism, religious accommodations, and Jewish culture and contributions as part of the Biden administration's National Strategy to Combat Antisemitism.

The pledge comes amid growing cases of antisemitism in workplaces.

In the US, 26% of recruiters admitted that they would be less likely to move forward with Jewish applicants, with 17% saying they have been told by their leaders not to hire from the group.

The recent Israel-Hamas war also quadrupled antisemitism incidents in the United Kingdom, BBC reported. The Community Security Trust there recorded 89 "anti-Jewish hate" incidents between October 7 and 10.

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