The Dark Side of Behaviour at Work

Corporations of every size have experienced the ‘dark side’ of human behaviour in the workplace – lying, stealing, sabotage, hacking, destruction of files and data. While the unsavoury task of dealing with less than honest or ethical employees is the exception to the rule for most HR professionals, it’s a task that has to be confronted nonetheless when it rears its ugly head

by A Furnham & J Taylor

Palgrave Macmillan, 2004

$49.95

Corporations of every size have experienced the ‘dark side’ of human behaviour in the workplace –lying, stealing, sabotage, hacking, destruction of files and data. While the unsavoury task of dealing with less than honest or ethical employees is the exception to the rule for most HR professionals, it’s a task that has to be confronted nonetheless when it rears its ugly head.

In recognition of this, authors Adrian Furnham and John Taylor set out to examine the psychology of deviance behind machiavellian employees in The Dark Side of Behaviour at Work: Understanding and Avoiding Employees Leaving, Thieving and Deceiving. It presents theories on why employees behave in less than positive ways, and examines the ramifications in the workplace. The book looks at the four basic types of cheats at work, and also compares the ‘dark side’ of the broader workforce to that of top management.

To their credit, Furnham and Taylor provide advice on identifying the causes of and prescriptions for reversing destructive employee behaviour, look at how HR can get it right in the first place and conclude with strategies for protecting assets and fostering loyalty and commitment. A frank look at the less pleasant, but sometimes very real world of work.

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