Generative AI fuelling hiring in Australian workplaces: survey

'Employers know it is an emerging field and so are willing to facilitate the upskilling of staff'

Generative AI fuelling hiring in Australian workplaces: survey

Generative AI is impacting Australian employers' hiring plans — but instead of eliminating jobs, it's adding more, according to Robert Half.

In its survey among 300 hiring managers, Robert Half discovered that 33% have increased hiring to keep up with innovation.

Another 34% said they have hired contractors or consultants to bring in specialised skills, 30% have shifted their focus skills that are more in demand due to AI, while 23% have outsourced certain projects for these initiatives.

"Generative AI will change how work is done, but that doesn't mean it will eliminate jobs in the process," said David Jones, Senior Managing Director APAC, Robert Half, in a statement.

The findings come amid fears that the implementation of generative AI in workplaces would make some roles redundant and lead to layoffs.

But Jones said that the environment of automation caused by AI is causing new job profiles to emerge.

"While there is a growing demand for workers who already hold these skills, employers know it is an emerging field and so are willing to facilitate the upskilling of staff," he said.

How is AI used in the workplace?

According to the report, generative AI is most used in automating support processes in workplaces (39%), along with:

  • Automating appointment scheduling and calendar management (34%)
  • Automating software testing and QA (33%)
  • Processing large volumes of data to improve system performance (30%)
  • Producing financial reports and dashboard for decision-making (29%)
  • Automating data entry (29%)
  • Writing job descriptions (29%)

Meanwhile, the respondents said their organisations are also planning to leverage AI on the following tasks:

  • Automating software development processes (53%)
  • Processing large volumes of data to improve system performance (49%)
  • Analysing and categorising customer feedback (49%)
  • Automating appointment scheduling and calendar management (45%)
  • Automating software testing and QA (38%)
  • Automating IT support processes (36%)
  • Benchmarking compensation and benefits (31%)

How are jobseekers using AI?

However, employers aren't the only ones taking advantage of generative AI.

According to Jones, job seekers have also been utilising the emerging tech to make it easier for them to come up with their resume, cover letter, among other requirements on job application.

Should this be accepted? More than half of the surveyed hiring managers believe it is somewhat or completely acceptable to use generative AI on the following:

  • Email correspondence (59%)
  • Resume (55%)
  • Cover letter (54%)
  • Technical evaluations (52%)

However, less than half of the respondents (48%) believe that it is acceptable to use generative AI on crafting writing samples.

"Employers are largely onboard with candidates using generative AI to help craft their job application materials as innovation and adaptability become a core business focus," Jones said. "Employers seek employees who do not fear the emergence of new technology as it hints at a forward-thinking mindset and openness to leverage new capabilities."

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