Number of women in leadership still lagging

The number of women entering the top leadership roles in the corporate world is still lagging according to a new report.

Number of women in leadership still lagging

The number of women entering the top leadership roles in the corporate world is still lagging according to a new report.

The latest Workmonitor Report from Randstad found just 38% of surveyed Australian employees reported that female employees make up at least half of the leadership positions at their current employer.

The number is low compared to the same survey undertaken overseas, where 63% of leadership roles in India are filled by females, 54% in Hong Kong, 48% in the US and China, and 43% in the UK.

Some 65% of the Australians surveyed also said it was more difficult for women to be promoted to leadership positions. Deb Loveridge, Randstad managing director Asia Pacific commented that Australian business leaders need to ensure there are legitimate career paths for both men and women. “While we have traditionally embraced diverse working environments, in an increasingly global marketplace it's vital Australia doesn't fall behind the rest of the world when it comes to having balanced leadership teams,” she said.

Positively, some 73% of Aussies said their company actively encourages female employees to pursue leadership roles, compared to 57% globally.

Randstad's Workmonitor surveyed some 13,000 employees, aged 18 to 65 and working a minimum of 24 hours a week in paid employment, across 32 countries during January.

Free newsletter

Our daily newsletter is FREE and keeps you up-to-date with the world of HR. Please complete the form below and click on subscribe for daily newsletters from HRD Australia.

Recent articles & video

HRD launches game-changing website redesign

Final tickets are available for award-winning HR event

The casual conundrum hidden under the Christmas tree

Restaurant chain tests 4-day work week

Most Read Articles

What does an exceptional leader look like?

What are the burning issues facing the future of HR?

How to invest in an 'authentic' inclusion policy