'Move over, millennials!': Gen Z is shaking up the world of work

Here's a closer look at these digital-savvy workers

'Move over, millennials!': Gen Z is shaking up the world of work

“They can’t remember life without a smartphone,” culture and compensation data platform Comparably describes the newest members of the workforce: Generation Z.

Born between the mid-90s and early 2000s, Gen Z are beginning to enter the workforce and gravitating to mostly technology-centric jobs.

Comparably compiled 15 of the most popular jobs (and salaries) where this digital-savvy generation thrives:

• Mobile developer $96,631
• Data scientist $96,115
• Product manager $95,266
• Developer $93,987
• DevOps engineer $87,400
• UI/UX designer $80,296
• Financial analyst $69,560
• Business analyst $69,367
• System administrator $67,464
• Operations manager $64,853
• Account manager $59,229
• Sales rep $53,891
• Technical support manager $50,306
• Marketing associate $50,185
• Customer service rep $43,924
 

The entry of Gen Z workers also signals a shift in the way the future workforce will view important workplace issues such as employee wellbeing, work-life balance, harassment and the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement, as well as the advent of artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency:

• 64% said they are satisfied with their work-life balance
• 67% believe the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement will lead to progress
• 58% believe the benefits of AI will outweigh the risks
• 40% believe cryptocurrency is a scam
 
Comparably analyzed workforce trends based on more than 2,000 anonymous responses from people aged 18 to 25 working across the technology sector.
 

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