HR the key to retain restless workers

Employers are under increased pressure to engage and retain their employees following research that reveals one in six workers have applied for a new job in the past six months.

HR the key to retain restless workers

Employers are under increased pressure to engage and retain their employees following research that reveals one in six workers have applied for a new job in the past six months.

According to a survey commissioned by Leadership Management Australasia (LMA) of 4,500 employees and managers, the amount of workers looking to change jobs has increased dramatically, up 135 per cent on previous years.

The results indicate that the post-financial crisis economic recovery has tipped the balance in the human resources market, restoring the ability of workers to seek alternative work as the risk of unemployment fades.

Grant Sexton, managing director of LMA said: "A spike like this is unheard of, a staggering and scary response. There’s a dramatic change in the workplace today which should be a major concern to every HR department and boardroom.”

While the findings present worrying news for employers, the survey offers an opportunity for the HR industry. The rise in employee movement offers HR businesses to become key strategic players in business planning and management, rather than simply providing a service.

“HR can deliver quantifiable returns on investment and considerable bottom line benefits in this environment,” said Sexton.

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