Workers ‘sleepworking’ – and managers to blame

Workers' access to tech tools not keeping up with demand, finds report

Workers ‘sleepworking’ – and managers to blame

A majority of workers are falling into a state of “sleepworking” – or the inability to perform at their full potential due to a lack of technology and strategic data.

Nearly three in five (58%) said their need for technology has increased in the last five years, but their access to tech tools isn’t keeping up, reported business intelligence and analytics company Domo.

It seems managers are not providing workers with what they need at work: 31% of employees said they feel uninformed about their company’s overall strategy and nearly half (45%) said they wish they had more access to data to inform strategic ideas.

“In this economy, organizations of all sizes must optimize every aspect of their business. And while one of the biggest and most strategic investments a business makes is in its people, organizations are not unlocking the full potential of their workforce if employees are ‘sleepworking’,” said John Mellor, Domo CEO.

Nine in 10 employees are still facing technical and remote work network problems at work, in the office, or in-between, according to a survey by Exoprise released in December 2022.

Benefits

Employers have a lot to gain by providing the necessary tech to employees. Overall, 62% of workers said they could get more work done with better tech tools, found Domo’s survey of more than 3,000 adults in the US, the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

“The results of this study show that with access to the right data and tools, every employee can be happier in their jobs, and become multipliers of business impact,” said Mellor.

Investing in organizational-wide technology also reduces costs and workforce turnover. In fact, 24% of workers report high turnover in the past 12 months – and that number skyrockets to 71% for those who say they work at companies that need more tech tools.

Businesses across the U.S. alone could recoup $6.5 billion each week in valuable work time with the proper tech, according to the report.

Also, 62% of workers said better access to useful tech would make them happier at work.

Investing in tech is also critical amid the current economic climate: 58% of employees across the globe say better access to technology can help weather an economic downturn.

“By offering employees access to data and modern technologies, an entire workforce can be enabled to do their best work and make the most impact for their business,” said Mellor.

Technology continues to evolve and influence the way people live their lives – the same goes for the way HR works and moves in a business, according to a previous report.

Technology plan 2023

Companies need a workplace technology plan in place in 2023, according to IT services provider ExcalTech.

“Unlike in times past, where the answer was as simple as allocating a desktop, a standard package of licensed software, and a phone for every full-time employee, remote/hybrid work, employee engagement, cybersecurity, and AI have rendered that approach obsolete,” it said.

“Most business leaders and IT departments are likely grappling with what technology they need and what they don’t to perform the work efficiently. IT Planning this year may include a good deal of purchasing but also a good deal of divesting.”

Recent articles & video

Return to office challenge: terminations upheld in courts

E-recruitment in Malaysia sees 16% annual growth

'Skills-First Transformation' growing more popular for firms globally: report

Government 'working on aligning' skills mismatch in Malaysia

Most Read Articles

Southeast Asia expecting salary increases in 2024

Employers requiring in-office attendance to enforce hybrid work

Middle managers unrecognised in addressing talent challenges: report