Singaporeans expect 4-day work week to be common within 4 years

Flexibility provides benefits 'like improved work-life balance, increased productivity, and reduced burnout,' says expert

Singaporeans expect 4-day work week to be common within 4 years

Employees in Singapore believe four-day work weeks will be commonplace at workplaces within five years, with the shift already observed in some organisations in the city-state, according to a new report.

The People at Work survey from ADP revealed that 32% of Singaporean workers expect four-day work weeks to be the norm in the next five years.

In fact, 21% of the respondents in Singapore said their employers are already implementing it to promote positive mental health at work - the highest across the APAC region.

"The four-day work week is gaining popularity for its potential benefits like improved work-life balance, increased productivity, and reduced burnout," said Yvonne Teo, Vice President of HR APAC at ADP, in a statement.

Flexibility valued in Singapore

ADP's survey, held annually across various countries, underscores the importance of flexibility for Singapore's workforce.

"Flexibility is not a perk but a foundational expectation," Teo said. "Our research shows Singapore employees value flexibility as the third most important factor to them in a job, after salary and job security. Employers today must offer FWA (flexible work arrangements) to attract and retain talent."

According to the report, employees are also expecting hybrid work models (34%) and full flexibility over hours (32%) to be common workplace practices within the next five years.

It comes as 67% of the respondents in the country said they already have some or complete flexibility over their working arrangements.

Despite this, less than half of respondents in Singapore are satisfied with their flexibility over hours (46%) or location (47%) - the lowest in APAC.

‘Tailored solutions’ for flexibility

Teo said effective implementation and communication are the keys to ensure that flexible work arrangements benefit everyone.

"Employees who desire flexible work arrangements should be proactive and have open conversations with managers to work out the best solutions," she said.

For employers, Teo said they can provide "tailored solutions" to accommodate their employees' flexibility needs through open dialogue.

"Striking a balance that considers both the company's needs and the well-being of its workforce is crucial to fostering a more positive and inclusive work environment," she said.

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