Last chance to get half-price tickets for HR Summit

Registrations are open for the 2017 event with an exclusive offer for the first 50 people to act

Last chance to get half-price tickets for HR Summit

The National HR Summit was recognised as the business event of the year at last week’s Publish Awards. To celebrate, we launched a special pre-program offer for HC readers with the first 50 people to act receiving a huge saving of over 50% on registration for next year’s event.
 
There are now less than ten passes left at this exclusive discount. Click here to register before they’re gone.
 
The National HR Summit is Australia’s leading independent HR event, first launched in 2002 and attended by some 1,000 HR professionals each year. Featuring multiple streams and some of the most inspiring and best informed local and international speakers, the National HR Summit offers unbeatable learning and networking opportunities.
 
The next National HR Summit returns to Luna Park Sydney on 29-30 March 2017. The program is currently in development and will be announced in coming weeks and months. As our special pre-conference price, the first 50 delegates can get tickets for less than half price, a saving of up to $1,050. These tickets will only be on sale until Monday 26 September or sooner if they sell out.
 
Click here to access one of the last seats available at this discounted rate. 2017 program information will be available in coming weeks at www.hrsummit.com.au.

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