NSW unveils 10.5% wage hike for public servants in new budget

Government also announces 'cost-of-living' protection payment for employees

NSW unveils 10.5% wage hike for public servants in new budget

The New South Wales government is promising thousands of public service employees a 10.5% wage increase, including superannuation, over the next three years in its recently unveiled 2024-25 Budget.

More than 400,000 public servants are expected to benefit from the pay hike, which is projected to outpace the estimated increases to the cost-of-living for the next three financial years, according to the state government.

"This is the next step in upholding Labor's promise to attract, reward, and retain essential workers including hospital staff, school staff, police and all other public sector employees," the NSW government said in a statement.

The government is also committing an annual $1,000 "cost-of-living" protection payment for public sector workers if inflation exceeds 4.5% in that year. This payment, however, will not be available to senior executives.

"This is about giving certainty for hard working families across NSW, with a three-year offer to see pay and conditions improve," said Treasurer Daniel Mookhey in a statement.

Protection against silicosis

Meanwhile, the NSW is also investing $2.5 million from the budget to enable SafeWork NSW to implement and ensure compliance with the upcoming engineered stone ban in July.

"This budget delivers on the Minns Labor Government’s promise to provide families with dignified, stable and secure jobs, and to ensure that they come home to their families safely," the NSW government said.

Engineered stone can contain more than 90% crystalline silica, a substance that has been known to cause a lung disease called silicosis.

The NSW government has already invested $5 million for silicosis research and patient support programme for workers and families who have been exposed to silica dust.

The Federal government has also launched a new national registry for silicosis and other occupational respiratory diseases to improve health and safety in workplaces.

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