The pressure of bad hires

A THIRD OF ALL bad hiring decisions are a direct result of pressure to fill a position, with hiring managers often relying on gut instincts when they’re in a hurry, according to recent research

ONE THIRD OF all bad hiring decisions are a direct result of pressure to fill a position, with hiring managers often relying on gut instincts when they’re in a hurry, according to recent research.

The study, which took in 1,515 hiring managers, found that while relying on gut instincts can accelerate the recruitment process, skipping consistent hiring procedure steps can end up costing more.

“The cost of a bad hire is much higher than the cost of leaving the role open for a few more weeks,” said Scott Erker, vice president of selection solution for DDI, which conducted the study.

It also found that hiring managers place a premium on teamwork when looking for new recruits, with 75 per cent wanting employees who are compatible in a team setting, while only 20 percent look for employees with ambition.

“In today’s working environment, very little is accomplished without strong collaboration,” said Erker. “Overly ambitious hires will often only look out for themselves, which can harm team productivity and morale.”

The study, which examined hiring manager’s experiences when interviewing, evaluating and hiring employees, also found that 57 per cent were turned off by inarticulate candidates or those who are vague about previous experience, while only 15 per cent were turned off by candidates who are late to the interview or lack knowledge about the company.

“Hiring managers don’t want to train people to communicate,” Erker said.

“If candidates are vague communicators in the interview, chances are they will be vague communicators in their jobs as well. It also indicates that they may be trying to hide something about past performance.”

The study also found hiring managers are still interested in employees who have been out of work for more than a year – but with reservations.

While 85 per cent said they would hire a worker who has been out of work, the majority noted that they would find out why the candidate has been out of work and how they have been spending their time off.

“No one wants to hire a lemon,”Erker said. He recommended hiring managers ask more questions to determine the candidate’s motivation or to detect indications that the candidate is counterproductive.

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