Are tech employees happy at work?

'The good news is that we know exactly where the issues lie and how managers can address them'

Are tech employees happy at work?

Happiness is proven to be a powerful force for success in the workplace, both economically and socially, according to Halcyon Knights CEO Lincoln Benbow.

As retention and performance rates fluctuate across the country, the business case for a renewed focus on morale is huge, added Benbow.

Indeed, with a happiness rating of just 6/10, tech workers in New Zealand and Australia are considerably less content than the global average for workplace satisfaction (8/10), according to new research by Halcyon Knights.

Moreover, 63% of respondents said that unrealistic expectations and excessive workload were their primary cause of unhappiness at work, with 55% also citing a lack of work-life balance as an important factor.

Discrimination or bullying based on identity was the cause of unhappiness for two fifths of respondents.

Benbow said the ‘Technically Happy' report found that stress, discrimination and a lack of work-life balance, can negatively affect a business’ competitive advantage – both commercially and when it comes to attracting and retaining talent.

"Only half of the respondents (52%) recommended their workplace as a great place to work, and two thirds (68%) don't believe there are good career opportunities for them at their current company. The need for a positivity boost is clear.”

‘Technically Happy’ also found that the leading influencers of happiness at work were the behaviours and attitudes of colleagues, with 63% of respondents agreeing this had a positive impact on their work satisfaction.

Other influencers of workplace happiness for tech professionals included flexible working policies (53%), the opportunity to do meaningful work (49%) and salary (47%).

According to the report, managerial influence is enormous when it comes to employee moods with the majority of respondents (65%) saying their boss’ mood at work negatively affected their happiness.

This top-down influence comes full circle, with 64% of managers’ agreeing that their happiness, attitudes and behaviours affected how happy their team is.

"The need for a positivity boost is clear. Only half of tech workers would recommend their workplace as a great place to work, and many don't believe there are good career opportunities for them at their current company," said Benbow.

"The good news is that we know exactly where the issues lie and how managers can address them through employee engagement, a strong employer value proposition and offering truly flexible working arrangement.”

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