'Good natured': Bunnings responds to criticism about how it handled a worker's chronic tardiness

'We have engaged the team to discuss how the situation may have been handled better'

'Good natured': Bunnings responds to criticism about how it handled a worker's chronic tardiness

Hardware company Bunnings has addressed a recent controversy over the firm's handling of tardiness in the workplace.

The company recently became the centre of attention after an employee was found wearing a large clock around his neck for reportedly being late to his shift.

The employee was spotted at the trades area of Bunnings Warehouse Dunedin last week, Stuff reported.

Witnesses at the scene saw the employee wearing a large clock around his neck. When asked about it, the employee said it was an expectation in their department if they turned up late to work.

'Good natured' intentions about tardiness

Dean Gick, regional manager at Bunnings, defended in a statement that their intention was "good natured" in asking late employees to wear a large clock.

No concerns were also raised over the situation, according to the regional manager.

"We understand some customers observed an interaction between our team in response to a team member who was late to their shift," he said as quoted by Stuff. "We have engaged the team to discuss how the situation may have been handled better."

Gick further maintained that it is "really important" for the company to create a safe and welcoming environment for its team members.

Employers have long been advised that prevention is the "best tactic" in reducing employee lateness.

"Employers should ensure they have implemented an up-to-date policy regarding employee conduct and a procedure for notifying someone when an employee is going to be late," Alastair Brown, chief technological officer at BrightHR, previously said.

Recent articles & video

Blenheim worker wins $16,000 in damages over unjust dismissal claim

Church stops paying pastor's salary, argues fixed-term employment

Racial harassment in the workplace – when group banter goes too far

Novartis to cut over 600 jobs amid global restructuring

Most Read Articles

HRD HR Awards New Zealand 2024 Winners

HR leaders gather for industry event of the year

New Zealand unveils changes to tighten visa scheme