Disconnects between HR, C-suite evident with layoffs: survey

'Lack of alignment can have negative consequences that reverberate across people teams'

Disconnects between HR, C-suite evident with layoffs: survey

A majority of HR leaders feel confident about their jobs this year, according to a new report, which also unveiled the impact of C-suite influence on HR professionals' well-being.

Lattice's 2024 State of People Strategy report, which surveyed over 1,000 HR and C-suite professionals across the world, found that HR teams are holding steady in the face of uncertainty.

According to the report, 65% of HR leaders feel confident about their job security, while 64% feel engaged.

Another 41% are meeting or exceeding their goals, and these are described as the high-performing teams who are most likely to have been receiving support from the C-suite, according to the report.

Source: Lattice's 2024 State of People Strategy report

Disconnected C-suite, HR team

Low levels of alignment between HR and the C-suite, however, have a negative impact on HR leaders' wellbeing.

According to the report, HR teams that aren't aligned with the C-suite are:

  • 59% more likely to feel overwhelmed and burnt out
  • 25% less likely to feel fully engaged with their job
  • 50% more likely to worry about job security for themselves or their team

"Lack of alignment can have negative consequences that reverberate across people teams and through to the employees they work with," the report read.

Consequences for HR, C-suite disconnect

The consequences can manifest during layoffs, according to the report.

"Laying off employees is an incredibly challenging decision that typically requires HR and C-suite leaders to move in lockstep as they make decisions to reduce their workforce, communicate changes, and provide support to employees," the report read.

However, the lack of alignment can see HR teams and the C-suite disagree over recovery from layoffs.

HR teams said their C-suite does not provide enough support for addressing low morale (59%), training managers on how to talk about layoffs (62%), or with redefining roles (63%).

There is also disagreement on recovery periods. Nearly three-quarters of HR leaders (74%) believe it could take up to four months to over a year for employee morale and productivity to rebound after layoffs.

Most of C-suite (66%), however, expect full recovery from four months to over a year, leaving HR with almost eight months to support employees through the recovery period without help from the C-suite.

"Without support from the C-suite during such a turbulent time, people teams are even less empowered to reach their goals and drive the kind of impact that could help keep the business afloat," the report read.

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