Early-career women cite remote work as career asset amid male-dominated offices

Survey finds 'critical differences' between how men and women perceive office-based work

Early-career women cite remote work as career asset amid male-dominated offices

Women who are early in their careers are more likely to perceive remote work as an arrangement helpful to their careers because offices remain an "inherently male playing field."

This is according to the latest report from the American Management Association (AMA), which surveyed 1,000 US knowledge workers about the impact of remote and hybrid work.

It found that only 29% of women agreed that working full-time in the office helps their career, compared to 37% of men.

On the other hand, more women view remote work as helpful to their career than men, according to the report.

Source: The American Management Association

Differences between genders

These findings come amid "critical differences" between how men and women perceive office-based work.

According to the report, men who are early in their careers are more likely to believe that working in the office offers various advantages, such as the ability to get coached and developed, increased productivity, increased collaboration with co-workers, job satisfaction, visibility to senior leaders, among others.

Women, on the other hand, are more likely to believe that there are no advantages to working in the office.

Source: The American Management Association

"Given the broad advantages cited by early-career men in the workplace, the most likely conclusion is that the office tends to be an inherently male playing field, more palatable to men and therefore favouring their success," the report read.

Manny Avramidis, president and CEO of AMA, commented that employers need to ensure that opportunities for development and advancement are provided across the board.

"Managers and leaders need to ensure their organisation's employees—regardless of gender and workplace environments—are being developed, coached and given opportunities for advancement equitably," he said in a statement.

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