Tech firm appoints first-ever global diversity head

Andrea Lawson was previously their global talent management leader

Tech firm appoints first-ever global diversity head

Equifax Inc. has appointed Andrea Lawson as the company’s first-ever senior vice president and chief talent and diversity officer.

Lawson, who was previously the SVP, global talent management, will continue to report to the data and tech firm’s chief HR officer, Carla Chaney.

In the newly created role, Lawson will be responsible for the organisation’s overall talent strategy with a focus on enabling genuine diversity and inclusion.

“We are excited to have Andrea lead this critical area for us,” said Chaney. “We are on a journey at Equifax to support our next generation of leaders by furthering an inclusive and diverse work environment that welcomes unique perspectives and she's exactly the kind of leader to help lead the way.”

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In her previous role, Lawson helped push Equifax’s culture and employee engagement strategy by integrating ‘refreshed’ company core values. She also established the company’s D&I strategy, and set clear key priorities as well as roadmaps.

Additionally, she launched the company’s employee network program to offer better support to staffers.

Before joining Equifax in October 2019, she had global leadership roles at various other technology firms.

Equifax, a data, analytics and technology company, is headquartered in Atlanta, US and supported by more than 11,000 employees worldwide. Equifax operates or has investments in 25 countries in the Americas, Europe, and the Asia Pacific region.

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