Fun Friday: Top ten most hated employee traits

A great personality ranks high on the list of attributes employers look for in job applicants

Fun Friday: Top ten most hated employee traits

Personality makes a huge difference at work. For 77% of employers, it’s one of the most important factors they consider when deciding to hire a candidate.

Apart from skills (80%) and experience (78%), personality ranks high on the list of attributes employers look for in job applicants, according to those polled by independent job board CV-Library and résumé specialist TopCV.

READ MORE: Experience vs personality: what wins the job?

Personality can manifest in the candidate’s attitude and behaviour. Hiring managers reported they would most likely be put off when an applicant appears to be:

  • Arrogant (65%)
  • Dishonest (62%)
  • Unreliable (60%)
  • Close-minded (26%)
  • Immoral (24%)
  • Ignorant (23%)
  • Entitled (18%)
  • Self-centred (17%)
  • Short-tempered (16%)
  • Cruel (16%)

On the other hand, hiring managers said they are impressed by candidates who are:

  • Reliable (62%)
  • Confident (61%)
  • Honest (58%)
  • Honourable (51%)
  • Loyal (32%)
  • Friendly (28%)
  • Self-disciplined (27%)

Even when a candidate lacks necessary experience, employers (62%) said they would rather hire someone who exhibits potential.

“In the current market, where skills shortages are making it harder for companies to find the right hires, employers are increasingly opting to recruit on potential over experience,” said Lee Biggins, founder and CEO of CV-Library.

“Of course, every hiring manager has their own preferences, but our research shows that there are a few key areas that could jeopardise someone’s chances of securing a job and these are all traits that we as humans seek to avoid.”

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