3 HR technology mistakes to avoid

Don’t spend thousands on HR technology only for it to be abandoned by those who should benefit from it the most. Take this advice from someone who’s seen it all

3 HR technology mistakes to avoid
If your company is going to spend thousands of dollars on HR technology, there’s nothing more important than making sure the investment provides as much value as it can. Unfortunately, iCIMS COO Adam Feigenbaum has seen many companies fail in that regard. He offered lessons learnt from the mistakes of other companies:
  1. Have your processes in order.
Technology can’t solve problems of process. “If you have a bad process, iCIMS will make it go more quickly, but it will just make a bad process go more quickly,” said Feigenbaum. “One technology isn't going to make somebody successful. Great technology and great process will put someone in a position to succeed.”
  1. Get buy-in from other key stakeholders
Where many companies fail is when the person who brought in the new system leaves the company. If nobody else has owned the original vision, it won’t have longevity, and it gets thrown away by predecessors, said Feigenbaum.
  1. Don’t stop training
Training people to use new technology should not be a once-off thing, said Feigenbaum. “When you bring in technology into a company, you should continually train and make sure people realize how to use it,” he said. That training can also be used to get feedback from staff about how to achieve most the most from the technology.
 

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