Young workers want better health and wellness benefits

Young talent are increasingly turning to employers for a healthy, well-balanced life

Young workers want better health and wellness benefits

The secret to attracting younger talent just might be in your health and wellness benefits for employees, according to a survey on well-being at work.

Four in 10 employees aged 18-24 said they considered the health and wellness benefits package of a company to be a “very important” factor when deciding whether to join an organisation.

However, 61% of workers in this age category also felt their work had a negative impact on their health and well-being, and only about a third felt they were responsible for their own health.

The results of the survey indicate how younger workers are increasingly turning to their employers to have a healthy, well-balanced life.

Beverage company Lucozade Ribena Suntory commissioned the research to encourage other businesses to take a closer look at the needs of their workers.

“Our research shows that priorities are shifting, with employees aged between 18-24, in particular, wanting their employers to put more emphasis on their health and well-being,” said Tracy Clarke, HR director at Lucozade Ribena Suntory.

“[We] want to continue playing our part in improving the nation’s health and well-being. This is why we’re sharing our insight and some of the biggest lessons we’ve learned along the way,” Clarke said.

In a 2016 research by Deloitte, 16.8% of millennials said they valued good work-life balance over career progression. Other studies echoed the same results, throwing in the need for a happy work environment as another factor that attracts young workers.

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