Heading for extinction: Office tools on endangered list

by Iain Hopkins28 Sep 2012

LinkedIn has produced a list of the office tools and trends on the brink of extinction in Australia – and secretaries can breathe a sigh of relief. No more cassette chewing tape recorders!

As part of its ‘Office Endangered Species’ study, LinkedIn surveyed more than 400 professionals in Australia and asked which offices tools and trends will most likely not be seen around offices by the year 2017. Hundreds of professionals agreed they could easily picture office stalwarts like tape recorders, fax machines and Rolodexes condemned to museum exhibits next to fossils and Tyrannosaurus Rex skeletons.

According to professionals, the top 10 items and office trends that are becoming ‘cubicle dinosaurs’ and could even disappear in the next five years are:


  • Tape recorders (86%)
  • Fax machines (79%)
  • The Rolodex (79%)
  • Standard working hours (66%)
  • Desktop computers (28%)
  • Desk phones (27%)
  • Formal business attire like suits, ties, tights, etc. (24%)
  • The corner office for managers/executives (23%)
  • Cubicles (17%)
  • An office with a door (15%)


Australian professionals selected tablets (66%), cloud storage (63%), working from home and smartphones (which tied at 56%) as office tools that are becoming more ubiquitous. Professionals in the US also selected tablets (62%) as the office tool that is ruling the Earth.

Professionals from Australia also hinted at several key dream tools they’d like to see in the future. These include having a clone or assistant to help you in your day (32%), a place in the office that provides natural sunlight (22%) and, in a sad but amusing reflection on modern day open plan offices, a mute button for their co-workers, so they don’t have to hear them talk (19%).


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