City official regrets re-naming street after Guns N' Roses

by Stephanie Zillman02 Nov 2012

A fan of Guns N’ Roses, who is also the county commissioner in Las Vegas, says she regrets her decision to re-name a street in honour of the band’s most famous song.

The name change was to coincide with the band's four-week run at the Hard Rock Hotel, and Paradise Road was temporarily changed to Paradise City Road, after the band's 1987 hit.

Commissioner Mary Beth Scow told the Las Vegas Sun that she regrets the temporary name change, and she would not have bestowed the honour on the band had she realised the sexually explicit image on the band’s latest promotional poster. “I hadn't seen the advertising before the media event,” Scow said. “It's clearly inappropriate. Maybe it's the risk of doing business with a rock band, but I guess we'll have some remorse over this decision. It's a lesson learned.”

Scow represented Clark County at a ceremony that renamed the road, after having prepared official street signs on the promise that the band's promoters would reimburse the $300 cost of doing so.

However, Scow said she had done her due diligence before the renaming, and had listened to the song before agreeing. She said she liked the line in the chorus, “Take me down to the paradise city, where the grass is green and the girls are pretty.”

The promotional image depicts a woman who appears to have been sexually assaulted beneath a “Welcome to Las Vegas” sign.

It's a sanitised version of the original banned cover for the album Appetite for Destruction, which featured a dishevelled woman with a breast exposed and underwear pulled below her knees.

The promotional versions currently touring Las Vegas on the sides of buses and cabs have the breast covered and don’t show the underwear, although the more risqué version is still on the band's website.

An advocate for domestic violence victims publicly commented that the county should rescind the street name change, and the band and venue should apologise for using the image.