industrial relations news

  • No hurry for Labor’s IR changes by

    DESPITE MUCH media hype, there will be no immediate and significant changes to industrial relations under the new Labor Government, according to a number of legal experts

  • Recruiters key to ageing workforce by

    AN AGEING population will cause the overall participation rate of workers to drop by about 9 per cent over the next forty years unless efforts are made to address the issue, according to chief economist of BT Financial Group, Chris Caton

  • My brilliant career – Richard Boggon by

    My brilliant career – Richard Boggon

  • Taking the bull of change by the horns by

    In this issue, our lead news story, “Poor communication’s high cost”, looks at the issue of why CEOs and managers need to take a more proactive approach to WorkChoices and industrial relations changes. Since the introduction of WorkChoices, many companies have opted for this approach given uncertainty around legislative changes, increased red tape, fears around increased union involvement or a simple ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ mindset

  • Poor communication’s high cost by

    MANY CEOs and managers who have taken a reactive ‘wait and see’ approach to WorkChoices are fostering a culture of management non-accountability and contributing to decreased morale and productivity, according to the Institute of Public Affairs

  • Striking a balance by

    Labor recently unveiled its industrial relations policy, which attracted the expected ruckus from government and business, and a mixed response from unions. Government and business claimed Labor’s policy would send Australia’s economy into a tailspin and put workers in union stocks. Interestingly, unions weren’t jumping up and down with joy. The ACTU was somewhat conciliatory in its response to Labor’s policy, supporting most elements while coming out against others

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