HR Strategy

  • Serious about improving morale? by

    Because morale affects every aspect of a company’s competitive advantage, it’s an important question to ask. However, as David Lee writes, many companies need to rethink their approach to boosting morale if they are to be effective

  • HR’s own skill shortages by

    Like many countries around the world, Australia is currently experiencing skills shortages. HR is often on the receiving end of this problem within companies, as management looks for options to ease skills shortages issue as much as possible. As such, HR is in a prominent position to make a significant contribution and help solve a real business problem

  • HR failing to prioritise global talent management by

    Between July and August, 2007, The Human Capital Institute (HCI) and Vurv Technologies surveyed HR and non-HR practitioners, managers and executives from North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific about their attitudes and experiences related to the role of HR in their organisations

  • Keep the HR faith by

    I feel compelled to respond to Nicholas Vaghenas (Sick and tired of HR rhetoric, issue 135, 21 August, p3) as it is precisely this thinking which creates the perception of HR failing its people. This magazine has continually reiterated the need for the HR professional to sit at the executive table. Your position has been that unless the CEO shares the vision and passion for excellent people management, then HR will simply never make headway

  • Taking the bull of change by the horns by

    In this issue, our lead news story, “Poor communication’s high cost”, looks at the issue of why CEOs and managers need to take a more proactive approach to WorkChoices and industrial relations changes. Since the introduction of WorkChoices, many companies have opted for this approach given uncertainty around legislative changes, increased red tape, fears around increased union involvement or a simple ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ mindset

  • Striking a balance by

    Labor recently unveiled its industrial relations policy, which attracted the expected ruckus from government and business, and a mixed response from unions. Government and business claimed Labor’s policy would send Australia’s economy into a tailspin and put workers in union stocks. Interestingly, unions weren’t jumping up and down with joy. The ACTU was somewhat conciliatory in its response to Labor’s policy, supporting most elements while coming out against others

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