Six ways to re-ignite a burned-out workforce

by Iain Hopkins18 Jun 2014
Leaders (including HR professionals) often work hard to motivate and stretch employees to reach continually increasing levels of output and creativity.
 
An issue arises, however, when workers face continual pressure to be innovative, hard-working, and quick on their feet.  At some point, the extraordinary becomes ordinary, and the employees who were once encouraged to make progress no longer feel they have any momentum to move forward.
 
HRD Magazine came up with six ideas that HR leaders can use to successfully light that spark once more.  Some of these strategies include:

· Carrying out an inspirational dialogue with staff.  It’s important to emphasize why new goals are necessary, and remain accessible and transparent so there’s no feelings of desertion

· Being honest about lofty expectations, and making it clear that supervisors are aware of the tremendous efforts required by their staff

· Not allowing anyone to compromise values, even if that employee is the superstar of an organization.  It’s essential to remember that one person can taint an entire corporate culture

· Recognising that some employees cannot handle additional tasks to their workload, while others prefer not to take on additional assignments.  HR leaders should be able to distinguish between the two, and react accordingly

· If some employees feel overwhelmed or struggle with physical or mental health issues, not trying to solve their problems.  Consult an expert

· Not succumbing to extreme leadership styles.  While it may seem that managers must choose between lenient or domineering methods of management, it is possible to be strong yet versatile
 
Perhaps most importantly, HR leaders should always maintain a strict balance between encouraging productivity and fostering a healthy relationship among employees and their work.  When it’s clear to workers that they are valued for their contributions as well as their personal attributes, often then they will feel reinspired to once again aim to reach new heights.

This article was adapted from When the going gets tough which was originally published in the May 2014 HRD Magazine. To read more click here.
 

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