Job hunters hooked on job boards and newspapers despite social media

by HCA13 Aug 2012

Job hunters hooked on job boards and newspapers despite social mediaAre you still posting jobs in newspapers? Think it might be time to update your process? Don’t delete those newspaper contacts just yet – pulling the plug on newspaper ads could lose you half your applicants.

Conventional wisdom says that companies need to move with the times to maximise the chances of getting the best applicants for their jobs – but if the majority of candidates are still looking at more traditional sources, then you’re still missing out.

A survey from Randstad, conducted by ICMA, found 72% of jobseekers rely on online job boards to find their next position, while 55% still use newspaper advertisements. Less than a quarter (22%) said they would use social media sites to find a job; however, that number represented the younger and better educated candidates.

"The job search is always changing and evolving," Randstad Canada president Jan Hein Bax said. "While these results indicate that traditional methods like job boards and newspaper ads are the most common way for [jobseekers] to find suitable employment, it's undeniable that technology will always play a prominent role in the job search process, especially with younger generations," he added.

Because of their ease with, and reliance on, technology, younger candidates were comfortable using “digital tools” to find their ideal jobs, Bax said.

"In past years, there was a heavy dependence on job boards, but now social media is becoming an integral part of finding a job. These days, recruiters who are not using these tools, are falling behind. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter are key for job-seekers and can sometimes offer more traffic than a job board," he added.

The best approach may be an all-inclusive one. Advertising online and in print continues to be vital to capturing your audience – and social media, recruitment agencies and networking events all have their place in finding the right person for the role.
 

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COMMENTS

  • by Katherine Karvess 14/08/2012 8:48:01 AM

    I agree with the all-inclusive approach...for now.

    In general, reading a newspaper - the actual folding and turning of pages - is something that I hope never goes away.

    The way we use social media is evolving at an alarming rate (no surprises there) and I think that the way we use social media to recruit workers will change too.

    Social media in recruitment is changing to be more than the unemployed posting about looking for work on their facebook pages, but employers building their employer brands; becoming a resource; showcasing their ideals - that will attract and retain the talent of the [not too distant] future.

    Cheers,
    Kat
    www.ellisjones.com.au

  • by Robin Pollock 16/08/2012 1:13:33 PM

    Companies cannot overlook the fact that there are still plenty of people out there who refuse to get caught up in social media - mainly to do with privacy reasons. Increasingly, we see companies marketing their wares via Facebook and the like in lieu of the old 1900 phone number approach. It might be interesting to see if their 'hits' have fallen as a result. I still read the weekend papers but have noticed a fall off in job ads. I do think many people are increasingly more comfortable with the likes of Seek and MyCareer and if one is time poor, those sites specialise and are efficient. But would I look for a job on Facebook - never - but this may be a generational thing. If companies want to attract the 20 somethings and not the 40 plus potentials out there, well then we could see a big shift to social media job ads. But that might bring with it the risk being labelled discriminatory.

  • by Kate Crawshaw 16/08/2012 9:42:41 PM

    I don't think a Facebook post replaces a job ad. However when I look around my office everyone has been employed based on a recommendation within a trusted network. This is where social media comes into play. Online networks are the fastest way to get the call out to people whose recommendation you value.

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