The key to staff happiness and performance

by HRD21 Sep 2017
The most effective approach for getting employees to promote their workplace is by aligning their role with the organisation’s narrative, according to Dr Lindsay McMillan, lead researcher at A future that works.

It’s McMillan’s belief that happy employees with purpose and meaning in their work will be the best advertisement any company could possibly hope for.

“Giving employees genuine purpose and meaning in the work negates the need for employee advocacy,” he said.

“An employee that understands the organisation’s goals is more likely to enjoy coming to work which will lead to a positive workforce and organisational brand.”

McMillan added that it is important that staff feel like they are valued and contributing to the goals of the business.

“If employees know how their role fits into the broader organisational objectives, they will be happier and more productive,” McMillan said.

“It may sound like a basic step – but it is surprising how often business leaders take this for granted, especially when the results are extremely beneficial.

“An employee that does not understand how they are contributing to a broader goal is more likely to be disengaged and unhappy in their job.

“This isn’t good for them or the reputation of the business.”

In order to create a workplace where employees are happy and engaged, McMillan said a number of principles must be adopted.

“We should be ensuring workplaces prioritise inclusion, staff development, teamwork and positive and constructive feedback to ensure the future workplace is founded on good principles,” he said.

Moreover, Nick Deligiannis, Managing Director of Hays in Australia & New Zealand, can also testify to the value of value of purpose.

Commenting on the report Staff Engagement: Ideas for action from last year, Deligiannis said employees who understand what they are working towards feel a greater sense of purpose and that’s a powerful driver of engagement.

“They feel they are making a difference and are working towards something that matters,” said Deligiannis.

“They’re also far more likely to support the organisation’s objectives because they understand them.”

Deligiannis added that these employees are given ownership in the organisation’s success since they know what is expected of them and what their part is in achieving the desired outcome.

“In contrast, organisations that don’t communicate employees’ role in achieving organisational goals create an atmosphere of uncertainty where senior managers and executives are seen to rule from above. A ‘them and us’ culture is created.”


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