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Power really does corrupt

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HC Online | 04 Feb 2013, 12:00 AM Agree 0
Managers may be more likely to perceive ‘wrongdoing’ in black and white term, so how can you stay more open-minded?
  • Leanne Faraday-Brash | 04 Feb 2013, 07:15 PM Agree 0
    Found this interesting in light of the fact that some of the people in positions of legitimate power in real life are renowned for turning a blind eye to immoral or otherwise unethical behaviour if the organisation or certain individuals enjoy a payoff from the said behaviour.
    I wonder if MBA students in this study with no potential real repercussions from rewards and punishments succumbed to social desirability and stepped up to decisive moral behaviour because the consequences were simulated and not real. If only all leaders would do the same when the top salesperson is also a sexual harasser and when a results-focussed manager is also accused of bullying.
    My experience of "vulture cultures" is that bad behaviour can be rewarded, justified and enabled if the end is seen to justify the means. Decisiveness here is no more important than quality decisions to shape good culture.
  • Leanne Faraday-Brash | 04 Feb 2013, 07:15 PM Agree 0
    Found this interesting in light of the fact that some of the people in positions of legitimate power in real life are renowned for turning a blind eye to immoral or otherwise unethical behaviour if the organisation or certain individuals enjoy a payoff from the said behaviour.
    I wonder if MBA students in this study with no potential real repercussions from rewards and punishments succumbed to social desirability and stepped up to decisive moral behaviour because the consequences were simulated and not real. If only all leaders would do the same when the top salesperson is also a sexual harasser and when a results-focussed manager is also accused of bullying.
    My experience of "vulture cultures" is that bad behaviour can be rewarded, justified and enabled if the end is seen to justify the means. Decisiveness here is no more important than quality decisions to shape good culture.
  • Pearl | 05 Feb 2013, 08:23 AM Agree 0
    I totally agree with "People who are in a position of power are more likely to view ‘wrongdoing’ unambiguously and are more likely to punish staff members by announcing a company restructure so that the person who does not agree with them will no longer be required in the restructure of the company

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