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Poor recruitment methods costing thousands

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HC Online | 14 May 2013, 12:00 AM Agree 0
Job defections cost the average Australian company (with 100 employees) an estimated $337,000 per year, according to research.
  • Steve Begg In-House Recruitment Group | 15 May 2013, 02:23 PM Agree 0
    Recruitment is and will always be a person to person process (although there is apparently a robot that google are building which will be the best recruiter ever).

    Technology is extremely helpful in improving the efficiency of the recruitment process but it will not replace it.

    The main point here is that recruiters (people) need to keep honing their skills so that they, as the ultimate filter, are able to identify issues within a candidate. Sure, technology will assist, but it will not replace the person (unless googles robot works).

    Also I question the generalisation that the 10% turnover is caused by poor recruitment. It may of been the best recruitment process in the universe, but the person the new candidate reports to is awful, and he/she is the main driver of turnover.
  • Nick Hines | 16 May 2013, 09:58 AM Agree 0
    I have written a number of articles, published on our website www.hmcgroup.net.au, that describe poor recruitment methods, including "10 Common Recruitment Mistakes". http://www.hmcgroup.net.au/a3739048-53d7-4aee-8f14-d2c9b8fd1726.html

    Here's the thing - the best people are NOT looking. If you want to attract the best people to your organisation, you need to really think about how you are going to reach them. The best people are not thinking about new opportunities, and probably not receptive to non personal advertising campaigns. They probably haven't updated their resume in many years. They are busy, usually well remunerated, and enjoy what they do. They are almost certainly not "on the books" with recruitment agencies. Ok some may be but only a tiny percentage of them. If you are in the business of just giving your company's jobs to "candidates" who are looking, then don't read on.

    Simply advertising, particularly only online, will really only fish where the job seekers are. Its like fishing with a net. Cast it out, see what you get and pick the best. At the moment there's lots of fish swimming so you may think its a good market for employment. Most of your recruitment efforts will be wasted sorting through applications and resumes. Often there are not enough candidates and you may conclude that there is a "talent" shortage, so you try to fit the best applicant into the position. Sometimes you may get someone better than average or even good, but hardly ever will you recruit an exceptional candidate.

    What you probably don't realise is that there are big fish out there, you just won't catch them with a net. You need the right rod, use the right bait, pick the right spot at the right time, and use the right technique to catch them. Most often this is best done using a professional third party who is reputable, experienced, discreet and confidential, and who can ethically and effectively identify and attract the best people for the job.

    You may have an internal candidate, but unless it is a clearly defined succession plan which is ready for transition, the best thing to do is to benchmark them against the best available. This will result in the best selection and importantly, it will ensure that the successful candidate has been chosen from a competitive process. Simply tapping someone on the shoulder may create the wrong dynamic, and give them a sense of entitlement.

    Finally, consider recruitment as an investment, not as a cost. Recruitment is the one time in the HR lifecycle when you have an opportunity to find the best.
  • Nick Hines | 16 May 2013, 10:02 AM Agree 0
    I have written a number of articles, published on our website www.hmcgroup.net.au, that describe poor recruitment methods, including "10 Common Recruitment Mistakes". http://www.hmcgroup.net.au/a3739048-53d7-4aee-8f14-d2c9b8fd1726.html

    Here's the thing - the best people are NOT looking. If you want to attract the best people to your organisation, you need to really think about how you are going to reach them. The best people are not thinking about new opportunities, and probably not receptive to non personal advertising campaigns. They probably haven't updated their resume in many years. They are busy, usually well remunerated, and enjoy what they do. They are almost certainly not "on the books" with recruitment agencies. Ok some may be but only a tiny percentage of them. If you are in the business of just giving your company's jobs to "candidates" who are looking, then don't read on.

    Simply advertising, particularly only online, will really only fish where the job seekers are. Its like fishing with a net. Cast it out, see what you get and pick the best. At the moment there's lots of fish swimming so you may think its a good market for employment. Most of your recruitment efforts will be wasted sorting through applications and resumes. Often there are not enough candidates and you may conclude that there is a "talent" shortage, so you try to fit the best applicant into the position. Sometimes you may get someone better than average or even good, but hardly ever will you recruit an exceptional candidate.

    What you probably don't realise is that there are big fish out there, you just won't catch them with a net. You need the right rod, use the right bait, pick the right spot at the right time, and use the right technique to catch them. Most often this is best done using a professional third party who is reputable, experienced, discreet and confidential, and who can ethically and effectively identify and attract the best people for the job.

    You may have an internal candidate, but unless it is a clearly defined succession plan which is ready for transition, the best thing to do is to benchmark them against the best available. This will result in the best selection and importantly, it will ensure that the successful candidate has been chosen from a competitive process. Simply tapping someone on the shoulder may create the wrong dynamic, and give them a sense of entitlement.

    Finally, consider recruitment as an investment, not as a cost. Recruitment is the one time in the HR lifecycle when you have an opportunity to find the best.
  • Phoebe Silver | 16 May 2013, 10:11 AM Agree 0
    @Steve Begg - "Recruitment is and always will be a person to person process" - how trite can you get!

    The point of this article is not that technology will replace humans but can enhance their effectiveness (you actually admit this whilst trying to advance the contary argument).

    If we followed your lead we would have banned radar because we will always need humans to see what's really real.

    And the 10%... that's not a generalisation, that's what's called an assumption - just like the $50,000 a year - that's what the word "model" is telling you.
  • Anita Power | 21 May 2013, 01:36 PM Agree 0
    As an experienced HR manager, I have seen a huge improvement in recruitment methods due to recent changes in technology, in particular, due to mobility and social media.

    Right now, the mobility movement has provided organisations with the ability to become more efficient. This is possible due to iPads disrupting the marketplace and businesses leveraging this to allow employees to be more efficient. The majority of people have iPads and prefer to use them at work where possible. People also now prefer to engage with each other visually, as seen by the increase in social media such as Facebook and LinkedIn.

    This means that people now interact with each other face-to-face from anywhere and at any time, just by using their iPads. Business grade mobile virtual meeting solutions such as PGi’s iMeet has enabled anyone and everyone in an organisation to collaborate face-to-face easily, with anyone, and whilst on the go.

    For recruiters and HR Managers, the mobility and social media revolution means that candidates can be interviewed face-to-face from anywhere at any time. Organisations can now shorten recruitment time-to-fill and broaden the talent pool, enabling them to find the top talent and hire them quicker than before. The add-on effect for HR leaders is that this new way for organisations to collaborate increases employee engagement.

    www.linkedin.com/pub/anita-power/18/545/658
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