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Pay and display: Would you make salaries company-wide knowledge?

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HC Online | 11 Jul 2014, 11:14 AM Agree 0
A US company lets employees look up each other’s salaries and bonuses in the interest of transparency. Should Australian companies be doing the same thing?
  • Paul | 14 Jul 2014, 01:23 PM Agree 0
    No
  • Deb | 14 Jul 2014, 03:29 PM Agree 0
    All salaries were public knowledge when I worked at the Reserve Bank
  • Kareen | 15 Jul 2014, 11:06 AM Agree 0
    In the Philippines, in the companies where I worked at least, It's not a welcome idea for the management. I think disclosure of salaries would create a rather restless work environment especially if the salary is not really standardized which means that employees of the same rank receive different salary rates. It would cause "commotion" and would entail inevitable staff complaints, demotivation, etc. It's a risk.
  • MM | 28 Jul 2014, 11:39 AM Agree 0
    In the "egalitarian" society such as ours, employers should have really good, logical, justifiable reasons why employees doing the same job get different wages. So keeping wages secret only helps management discriminate.

    This is something the new Gender Reporting is supposed to assist with when the reports actually start happening and being published
  • Amanda Rochford | 28 Jul 2014, 12:39 PM Agree 0
    Completely agree with this statement - In the "egalitarian" society such as ours, employers should have really good, logical, justifiable reasons why employees doing the same job get different wages. So keeping wages secret only helps management discriminate.

    I work in the public service and everyone knows everyone else's pay.

  • caca | 28 Jul 2014, 01:57 PM Agree 0
    Although a part of me agrees with what Amanda and MM have said, I also understand that the value of employee does vary.
    For an easy example, you may have a staff member who has more experience and therefore in theory has more value to bring to a role. It would be fair that the person with more experience going into a position may get a higher remuneration for a job that someone else is also doing.
    Another thing to keep in mind is current market rate may likely be higher than when someone else previously started. It's an unfortunate reality that most businesses cannot give more than the 3% or less annual inflation raise to their staff where as someone new coming into a role can come in and current market rate perhaps 10-15% higher than those who've been at a company for a period of time.
  • MM | 28 Jul 2014, 02:51 PM Agree 0
    caca - your 1st point could be "logical and justifiable", but there is no "good" reason to pay people coming in more than the people doing the current role. That's just poor management by the company and undervalues all the proven good performers they have. Encourages high turnover.
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