Human Capital forum is the place for positive industry interaction and welcomes your professional and informed opinion.

Can you make your workplace happier? You bet

Notify me of new replies via email
HC Online | 27 Feb 2014, 12:00 AM Agree 0
When your employees are happy, they are also more creative, productive, less likely to leave the company, less absent, and less conflicts at work which means more money and better product. HC offers up 15 ways to start reinventing your workplace.
  • Dr Tim Baker | 22 May 2013, 04:20 PM Agree 0
    A happy workplace is obviously better than an unhappy workplace; but a happy workplace doesn't necessarily equate to a productive workplace. I have yet to find any compelling research to demonstrate conclusively the link between the two.

    Consider a country club: It is probably a happy place, but not too much productivity is likely to occur there!

    I think it is also important to point out that you can't make anyone happy. It is ultimately people themselves that make that choice. You can create the environment that may increase the likelihood of employees being happy, but you can't make them so.

    The 15 techniques mentioned are very much manager-driven. The quality of leadership is critical in all this. You can have great lighting and call people by their name and this won't make the slightest different if the manager is a very poor leader with a low EQ. So before using Lang's recommendations, I would ensure that I have a great set of managers first and ironically - if that is the case - many of these recommendations would be happening automatically.

    So I think striving for an enjoyable workplace setting is a good thing, but other strategies need to be considered if the employer wants a more productive environment.
  • Mick Liubinskas from Wooboard | 22 May 2013, 04:21 PM Agree 0
    Very glad you put recognition first. We've seen a big increase in happy customers and a big decrease in staff turnover due to daily recognition.

    The great thing about recognition is that it makes the giver as happy as the receiver. It can also make the rest of the team happier too if it's shared.
  • Mick Liubinskas from Wooboard | 22 May 2013, 04:22 PM Agree 0
    Very glad you put recognition first. We've seen a big increase in happy customers and a big decrease in staff turnover due to daily recognition.

    The great thing about recognition is that it makes the giver as happy as the receiver. It can also make the rest of the team happier too if it's shared.
  • Mike Symonds | 29 May 2013, 10:55 AM Agree 0
    Interesting article. The first 5 points are all pretty much the same...Appreciate and say thank you, which is all about being grateful. The more we focus on something positive within a workplace, whether it is behaviour or outcomes the more of that we will foster. We (Funergizers) run programs for businesses designed to help them create a more fun, interactive and engaged workplace, with fun team events being one of our major tools. There is copious amounts of research now that shows the connection between happiness and success, Shawn Achor's book the happiness advantage is a great read for anyone wanting proof. Obviously to be successful you still need to set goals and take action. However if we are happy within that 'action' we are more likely to be successful.
  • Paul | 30 May 2013, 04:28 PM Agree 0
    It’s a 50/50 split; companies need to provide an environment that is safe and conducive for employees being happy and staff need to acknowledge that they are also accountable for their own happiness.
    It also important to note that companies are not accountable for happiness, however they can provide a conducive environment that removes “Sadness”.
    That is to say take away the niggling little bad things that add up and pull the culture down.
    But it needs to be monitored, the little benefits are not staff rights, but rather demonstration of a flexible two way relationship.
  • Paul | 30 May 2013, 04:28 PM Agree 0
    It’s a 50/50 split; companies need to provide an environment that is safe and conducive for employees being happy and staff need to acknowledge that they are also accountable for their own happiness.
    It also important to note that companies are not accountable for happiness, however they can provide a conducive environment that removes “Sadness”.
    That is to say take away the niggling little bad things that add up and pull the culture down.
    But it needs to be monitored, the little benefits are not staff rights, but rather demonstration of a flexible two way relationship.
  • Dr Tim Baker | 30 May 2013, 07:13 PM Agree 0
    Paul, you speak a lot of sense. It is indeed a 50:50 arrangement as you put it. It is ultimately about creating a collaborative culture as you put it.
  • Greytip | 11 Dec 2013, 10:30 PM Agree 0
    Happy work environment sparks a happy employees which lead to more productivity and efficiency. We recently published a blog on the same concept. http://www.greytip.in/blog/2013/11/28/happier-workplace-takes-care-small-things
  • Gockoo | 27 Feb 2014, 02:48 PM Agree 0
    We have a workplace which encourages recognition between colleagues as well as management. We give each other gold stars with a brief explanation on how that person has excelled. Every month 2 people are asked to share their gold stars at the team meeting. As listed in the article we have flexible working hours to accommodate family commitments. Highs and lows of daily lives are shared and embraced or supported. Care for others is a company value and it appears on hour masthead. We care for each other as well as our customers. Many people ask me how they can get a job with my company as we appear happy and relaxed and most importantly deliver a high quality service.
  • Keyur Anjaria | 02 Jul 2014, 11:14 AM Agree 0
    Respect, recognition and empathy. I have found these three things contribute greatly to the overall engagement and satisfaction levels for all staff. staff, are as much human as managers or any other person for that matter. A bit of empathy to recognise, that individual performance levels can fluctuate as a result of of external stressors is useful and even better when staff know that 'tolerances' exist around that factor.
Post a reply