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Australia well behind on mature age employment

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HC Online | 05 Aug 2009, 12:00 AM Agree 0
A new report launched this week has found Australia continues to lag behind international counterparts when it comes to mature age employment.

  • Neville | 06 Aug 2009, 12:35 PM Agree 0
    Age discrimination in recruitment starts at 39 not 55
  • Melanie | 06 Aug 2009, 02:01 PM Agree 0
    Employers often use the same channels for sourcing candidates and wonder why they get the same result. Try niche channels for attracting experienced workers that have worked for me in the past like www.adage.com.au and www.careermums.com.au
  • Kay Franks | 06 Aug 2009, 03:29 PM Agree 0
    I can vouch for this. I am 58 and looking for 3 day a week work. I am professionally trained in community and town planning but finding it difficult to source the job, let alone apply for any relevant positions. I am at a loss to find a balance in my life; the choice seems to be full time or not at all!
  • Kay Franks | 06 Aug 2009, 03:31 PM Agree 0
    I can vouch for this. I am 58 and looking for 3 day a week work. I am professionally trained in community and town planning but finding it difficult to source the job, let alone apply for any relevant positions. I am at a loss to find a balance in my life; the choice seems to be full time or not at all!
  • carmelina | 06 Aug 2009, 05:32 PM Agree 0
    Look at the recruiters' age and then ask yourself do they have the depth of life experience, and life knowledge to choose the right person for your workplace. I am always surprised by organisations who employ young HR graduates to manage the recruitment portfolio. How can they assess the skills and experience level of a candidate who has been working for 30 years when they have been working less than 5. HR Directors need to get real as do other senior management in Australian organisations.
  • carmelina | 06 Aug 2009, 05:32 PM Agree 0
    Look at the recruiters' age and then ask yourself do they have the depth of life experience, and life knowledge to choose the right person for your workplace. I am always surprised by organisations who employ young HR graduates to manage the recruitment portfolio. How can they assess the skills and experience level of a candidate who has been working for 30 years when they have been working less than 5. HR Directors need to get real as do other senior management in Australian organisations.
  • P V Isaac | 07 Aug 2009, 09:44 AM Agree 0
    I have heard many mature jobseekers complain that, the principal reason they are not hired is because they are a threat. They may know more and have better ways of doing things which can expose the inexperienced. There is some truth in that.And sometimes mature age candidates unknowingly contribute to that threat.

    We like people who have something in common with us and we hire them becasue of that common factor. Young recruiters therefore prefer and hire young candidates.

    Having said that I think mature age people should become a bit more competitive. They should strive to find a common ground between them and the young recruiters and help the recruiters not focus too much on the threat factor and other illusionary issues like cultural misfit.

    Bottom line is, become more likeable!!!!!Nothing beats the "Likeability Factor"
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